WORKS – SciArt Illustrations by Andreas Samuelsson

In ALL, WORKS by Julia Krolik

The New York Times publishes bi-weekly features in Diagnosis, where Dr. Lisa Sanders describes harrowing tales and near-misses of many, often common health conditions. The articles serve as a great health-science communication resource, acting as the translated equivalent of medical case-studies. The material is brought to life through a colourful and complimentary visual narrative by Andreas Samuelsson. For this post we showcase these illustrations out of context, solely drawing attention to their aesthetic.

From: A Strange Itch, Trouble Breathing, Then Anaphylactic Shock

From: It Looked Like a Familiar Case of Depression, but Could It Be Something Else

From: The Patient Was a Veterinarian. Could His Illness Be Related to Animals?

From: It Looked Like a Familiar Case of Depression, but Could It Be Something Else

From: The Patient Was a Veterinarian. Could His Illness Be Related to Animals?

From: A Painful Bruise Wouldn’t Heal. It Took Several Hospital Visits to Discover Why

From: If the Boy Had Pneumonia, Why Did He Have Odd Sores on His Body?

From: It Started as Sinus Headaches — But Things Got Deadly.

From: It Began With Sudden Blackouts. Then Came Some Alarming News.

From: Her Various Symptoms Seemed Unrelated. Then One Doctor Put It All Together

From: Why Did Her High Blood Pressure Turn Dangerously Low?

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About the Author
Julia Krolik

Julia Krolik

Julia helps SciArt through Art the Science, wrangles data and makes SciArt through Pixels and Plans. She speaks passionately about the importance of visual communication in information sharing. She lives by this quote: "They are ill discoverers that think there is no land, when they can see nothing but sea." - Francis Bacon | Twitter: @yuliakrolik